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“After a month of various tests, one appointment with my specialist changed everything. He sat me down and told me that I had cancer.  It was a stage 3/4 diagnosis and I replied to him with a giggle that I don’t do things in half measures. I don’t think he knew what to do with my humour – I was a little shocked but what was I to do?  It was what it was.

I am a strong and independent 36-year-old woman who loves life, loves being creative, loves people and loves the challenge of a project as well as my bulldog, vintage clothing and white top stitching on anything! I have been married to my best friend for 16 years and am the mother of three beautiful children aged 9, 6 and 2. My family are my sanctuary and so very important to me. I live in South West WA on the beautiful coast in Bunbury. I enjoy everything about living in a regional city. Beach walks, beautiful food and the best coffee are all on my doorstep as well as the emphasis on family life. It’s a treat raising my kids here.

It was curiosity that took me to the Look Good Feel Better workshop as I wanted to see what I could do to help my appearance through this chapter in my life. It was one thing having cancer, but I didn’t want to always look like I had cancer.

I was blown away by the extensive knowledge and expertise of the Look Good Feel Better volunteers who were also very supportive.  I learnt a few different things from the workshop, especially around the importance of sunscreen on my face and my poor bald head. But for me, it was being in a room with other ladies who were in the same boat as me, having a laugh and encouraging each other through what is a life changing experience.  The Confidence Kit I received took me by surprise. It was so generous and to know this was all donated was truly inspiring.

I would definitely recommend Look Good Feel Better to other women going through treatment for cancer. The tips you receive to help yourself not look like a cancer patient are assuring and helpful.  Being in a room of women in the same position as you is also comforting and you walk away empowered to still embrace your femininity, even though some of it has been taken away.

Since my diagnosis, I have had to slow down and rely on other people more than I ever have before. Colours seem more vivid and the kids’ giggles are treasured a lot more. I don’t sweat the small stuff. It has given me a new perspective on the fact that we never know what a person is going through so we need to treat everyone with care and kindness. Life is short and people are important. We should treat them and ourselves accordingly”.